Hall of Fame 1997

 
Mr. Ellis ‘Edgar’ Achong
Sir Henry Alcazar, Kt., K.C.
Mr. Felix Amoroso-Centeno
Hon. Vincent Brown, K.C.
Captain Arthur A. Cipriani
Sir Ellis Clarke, T.C., G.C.B., G.C.M.G.
Monsignor C.B. de Martini
Sir Louis de Verteuil M.D., K.C.M.G.
Sir Errol Dos Santos C.B.E.
Fr. Leonard Graf, C.S.Sp., C.M.
Sir Solomon Hochoy, T.C., G.C.M.G., O.B.E.
Sir Gaston Johnston, Kt., K.C.
Dr. Joseph Lennox Pawan, M.B.E.
Mr. Raymond Quevedo (Atilla the Hun), H.B.M.
Mr. Clifford Roach, H.B.M.

Mr. Ellis ‘Edgar’ Achong

Ellis Edgar Achong was a prominent sportsman of the 1920’s and 1930’s. He was a former W.I. orthodox slow left-arm spinner and Maple left-wing. He was a member of the famous Maple forward line in the 1920’s along with his contemporary Clifford Roach. He was born on February 16, 1904 and died August 29, 1986 at 82 years. At the time of his death, he was the oldest-surviving Trinidad Test cricketer.

Achong appeared in six Test matches for the West Indies making his debut at the Queen’s Park Oval y England in the home series of 1929-30, where his duel with Patsy Hendren was one of the highlights of that match. He was picked for the 1933 team for England. He bagged 71 wickets on that tour and played in all three Tests.

His career ended in 1935 but he settled in the Manchester area and played League cricket, for Rochdale and Heywood until 1951, capturing some 1200 wickets. He was the first and only player of Chinese extraction to represent the West Indies, but contrary to popular belief, he did not invent the ‘chinaman’ which is the left-hander’s back of the hand ball made famous by Fleetwood-Smith and Gary Sobers. He returned home in 1952 and two years later served as Test Umpire in the Port of Spain match y England.

Ellis was appointed a government coach in the 1950’s and made a valuable contribution to schools’ coaching programme and also assisted in the laying of turf pitches. In addition to his cricket skill, he was also a fine footballer, representing Trinidad from 1919 asa teenager, to 1932.

Sir Henry Alcazar, Kt., K.C.

In his time he was one of the most brilliant students at CIC, being first on the list of Island Scholars in 1877 and winning the Jemingham Gold Medal. He was admitted to Gray’s Inn in England following which he was called to the Bar in Trinidad. He went on to become a prominent lawyer, having been engaged in most of the important legal disputes in the colony. He performed with distinction among a galaxy of eminent legal luminaries and in 1897 he was honoured as a King’s Counsel.

Apart from his talent in the legal field, he was an eloquent and polished speaker who used these skills to advocate the rights of the people. He acted as a Puisne Judge of the colony and also as Chief Justice. He also served as President of the Trinidad Bar Council.

For many years, he was a member of the Port of Spain City Council, during which time he was elected Mayor for four years.

As an unofficial member of the Legislative Council of the Colony, he took an active part in the reform movement for representation in the legislature, being one of the prime movers seeking to have members elected to the Council rather than being nominated.

In 1915, he was appointed to the Executive Council of the Legislature and was the first unofficial member to serve on that body. He is numbered among those who fought for an end to indentureship among East Indians.

Sir Henry was known for his extreme loyalty to the Catholic Church and St. Mary’s College, representing their causes in the Legislative Council on many occasions. He was knighted in 1918.

Mr. Felix Amoroso-Centeno

He is one of those individuals who is regarded as an institution at St. Mary’s where he served as a lay master for five decades under five Principals.

He has helped to guide many students of CIC who went on to become outstanding citizens of Trinidad and Tobago, among them doctors, lawyers, priests, scientists, politicians and the ordinary men without whom no country could survive. In 1948 when he celebrated his silver jubilee as a teacher at CIC the then Principal, Dr. J. Meenan remarked: “Mr. Centeno has given 25 years of his life to the boys of St. Mary’s College. There are other ways of passing one’s life,far more lucrative,far more profitable from the material point of view, but Mr. Centeno has never looked on his teaching here as a trade, or even as a profession but looked at it as a vocation. He taught the boys here to be true Christians by his life and sterling character.”

He had a great interest in Spanish culture and was honoured by the Spanish Government in 1948. The Venezuelan Government honoured him in 1963.

His role as a teacher is well known and highly respected but equally so is the great part he played in the establishment of the co-operative movement in Trinidad. The thousands today who participate in and benefit from Credit Union membership recognize the debt owed to him. For years he traveled all over Trinidad and Tobago with officers of the League lecturing on the subject taking as his theme: “Never build co-operatives faster than you can build co-operators.” He worked ceaselessly with Fr. Long and Mr. Milne, seeking to establish the credit union movement on a solid foundation.

Mr. Centeno was indeed a gentleman, a guide, a friend, who spiced every lesson with the greatest lesson of all, true Christian principles.

Hon. Vincent Brown, K.C.

The Honourable Vincent Browne was born in St. Vincent but came to Trinidad at an early age. At CIC he was one of the most brilliant scholars and after leaving there he went to England and enrolled at Gray’s Inn - the first person from Trinidad to do so. He was called to the Bar in record time and on his return to Trinidad he was involved as a junior in most of the important cases, impressing all, including the then Chief Justice who was known to be particularly harsh on young practitioners.

He was appointed as a magistrate and later became Solicitor-General prior to his appointment as Attorney General. When he took up the latter post he had already become a King’s Counsel.

Justice Vincent Browne was known as a man who promoted the social advancement of youth in the colony and one who helped struggling but worthy individuals to achieve their goals. He came to be regarded as a leader of the people and took a foremost part in any movement which tended towards their political upliftment, making many masterly speeches on politics throughout the years.

One of his sons, Kenneth Vincent Browne continued in his brilliant footsteps and was the first colored man to be appointed as a Senior Puisne Judge. Another of his off-spring, Sonny Vincent Browne was a legendary and highly successful football coach at CIC for many years.

Captain Arthur A. Cipriani

He was born in 1875 to a French Creole land-owning and business family. He rose to the rank of Captain in the British West Indies Regiment after enlisting at the beginning of the First World War. Defending West indian servicemen against discrimination in the military, he became very popular, and on his return was elected President of the Soldiers and Sailors Union. He joined the Trinidad Workingmen’s Association and became its President, championing the causes of the working-class people in Trinidad. He worked towards bridging the gulf between working people of East Indian and African descent. He became a member of the Legislative Council in the island’s first national elections in 1925 by winning the Port of Spain seat by an overwhelming majority, and was a member of the Port of Spain City Council continuously from 1926 - 1941. He served as Mayor of Port of Spain for a record eight (8) times. Between 1925 and 1938, he used his voice in the Council in defence of working class interests such as workman’s compensation, old age pension and minimum wage. He defended legislation to protect trade unions, and in 1932 was successful in getting a Trade Union ordinance enacted by the British Government. He also served as President of the CIC Past Students Union.

Sir Ellis Emmanuel Innocent Clarke, T.C., G.C.B., G.C.M.G.

Sir Ellis was a brilliant student at St. Mary’s where he won an Island Scholarship and the Jemingham Gold Medal in 1936. From CIC he went to London University and was subsequently called to the Bar at Gray’s Inn. Back home in Trinidad, he engaged in private practice for just over 13 years during which time he built up a sterling reputation as a criminal and civil lawyer and a leading Junior counsel. Later, he assumed a number of prominent positions in the country. From Solicitor General in 1956, he became Deputy Colonial Secretary in 1957 and Attorney General in 1958. His meteoric rise continued with him being appointed Chief Justice designate in 1961 but he never took up this post.

In the year before Trinidad attained Independence he was the Constitutional Adviser to the Cabinet and in 1962 he was appointed as this country’s Ambassador to the United States and Permanent Representative at the United Nations. He served as Ambassador until January 1973 when he relinquished that post to become Governor General. Sir Ellis served as Governor General until 1976 when Trinidad and Tobago became a Republic and he was made this country’s first President.

Sir Ellis has the unique honour of having been knighted on three separate occasions by the Queen of England. He received this country’s highest honour, the Trinity Cross, in 1969. He has played a prominent role in shaping the legal framework of Trinidad and Tobago and is regarded as an expert on this country’s Constitution. He demitted office as President in 1987 and has since become a Consultant. He was selected by the Past Students Union for induction into the St. Mary’s College Hall of Fame. He remains a loyal supporter to his alma mater.

Monsignor C.B. de Martini

He was reputedly the first student to seek admission and to be enrolled to the Halls of St. Mary’s on arrival of the Holy Ghost Fathers in Trinidad in July 1863. He was noted for his zeal for the spiritual enrichment of his flock, and was most keenly identified with education, and agricultural development. He was instrumental in establishing a branch of the Agricultural Society in Arima, and was responsible for establishing a large number of schools in Trinidad and Grenada.

In spite of much opposition from various directions, he established a flourishing school in every parish in which he worked. He served six (6) years as Vicar General in Grenada and was there extolled as the champion of Catholic education.

Sir Louis de Verteuil M.D., K.C.M.G.

The Hon. Sir Louis A.A. de Verteuil, M.D., K.C.M.G., was born in 1807 and died at the age of 93. At an early age, he was sent to France to complete his education. He adopted the medical profession and returned to Trinidad in 1837. He became actively engaged in politics and was anxious for reform, being well known as a passionate anti-colonialist. He was also noted for his zeal and devotion to the Catholic church, and was a member of the delegation of Catholics from Trinidad to the Holy See in 1862 for a group of priests to establish St. Mary’s College. He was one of the greatest champions of the College until his death.

His devotion to the church procured for him, first, the Order of St. Gregory the Great and secondly, the distinction of being named Count of the Holy Roman Empire. Dr. de Verteuil was for three years consecutively, Mayor of Port of Spain. He was also for many years, a member of the Legislative Council of the country and on his retirement received a well-merited tribute of praise from the Governor, fully endorsed by his colleagues at the Medical Board of which he was President. He always took a lively interest in educational matters as well as in all matters connected to his profession and to the Island.

He was decorated by the King with a knighthood, KCMG.

Sir Errol Dos Santos C.B.E.

Sir Errol had a long career in Government service and worked his way through the ranks to become Financial Secretary, Colonial Secretary and also Acting Governor of Trinidad and Tobago. He was knighted in 1946.

After his career in the public service, he become involved in the private sector where he was recognized as one of the leading businessmen in the country. He headed Carib Brewery and Carib Glassworks in their fledgling days and went on to become Chairman of Alstons Limited, which was later merged into the McA1 Group.

He was also well known for his role in the development of West Indies cricket, mainly through his work at Queen’s Park Cricket Club. He was elected Vice-President of Queen’s Park in 1943 when, according to the then rules, the Governor of the colony was the President. When this rule was changed in 1962 he became President, an office which he held until he migrated in 1982. To a large extent, he was personally responsible for the development and improvement of the Queen’s Park Oval which is today one of the leading cricket centres in the world. He also served as President of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control for eight years.

Fr. Leonard Graf, C.S.Sp., C.M.

Leonard Joseph Graf came to Trinidad from Germany as a student for the priesthood in the congregation of the Holy Ghost Missionaries. He returned to CIC as a priest and was appointed Dean of Studies and professor of Greek, Latin and French as well as of Botany and Zoology at the then Higher Certificate level.

During Fr. Graf’s time at the College, this country witnessed what may be called ‘the golden years of St. Mary’s’. Under his expert and devoted tutelage, CIC for about 20 years secured almost a stranglehold on the then annual Island Science Scholarship (he was himself a self-taught scientist). He combined scholarly erudition with the ability to impart knowledge and tempered discipline with dry but no less gentle humour.

He was a man of boundless energy, being in charge of the Debating Club, Choir, Library and Drama Club and editor of the College Annual. He produced the Golden Jubilee Annual and 50 years later, the Centenary Annual in 1963.

At CIC, he was Dean of Studies for almost 40 years and Senior Greek Master for 60 years before retirement from active teaching service in 1966.

He joined the Trinidad Field Naturalists Club in 1924. He was a frequent lecturer there and in 1931 presented a series of lectures in botany and zoology for the Club’s younger members and became its VP and finally President in 1940; a post he continued to hold until 1945. He served on the Management Committee from 1930-70.

He was truly a devoted teacher and reports are that in his 61 years at CIC, he was absent from school only two (2) days. He received the Chaconia Medal for long and meritorious service to education in 1969.

Sir Solomon Hochoy, T.C., G.C.M.G., O.B.E.

He was born in Jamaica in 1905, migrating to Trinidad at the age of 2. He grew up in the village of Blanchisseuse and attended CIC from 1917 to 1922.

In 1927, he embarked on a long and distinguished career in the Civil Service. He rose through the ranks, from humble beginnings as a junior tally clerk in the Harbour Master’s Office, to become Labour Commissioner in 1949, and was awarded the Order of the British Empire (O.B.E.) in 1952. In 1954, he became Deputy Colonial Secretary and after acting in the position of Colonial Secretary the following year, was confirmed in that position in 1956.

In 1959, he was made a Knight Commander of the Order of St. Michael and St. George and was appointed to the office of Governor of Trinidad and Tobago, the country’s last.

With the country’s emergence as an independent state in 1962, Sir Solomon Hochoy became its’ first Governor-General. He was awarded the Trinity Cross in 1969 for his outstanding service to the nation. He died in 1983.

Sir Gaston Johnston, Kt., K.C.

Sir Gaston has gone down in history as one of the outstanding criminal defence lawyers in Trinidad and Tobago and indeed the Caribbean Region. In fact, he was knighted for his prominence in law. Born in 1876, he was called to the Bar in 1898 and was later made a King’s Counsel. He served as President of the Bar Council in Trinidad and Tobago for some twenty years and the West Indies Bar Association for one year, testimony to the high regard in which he was held by his legal colleagues. He was fondly known as the Grand Old Man of the Bar.

In 1916 he was elected as a member of the Port of Spain City Council which he served for 25 years, five of them as Mayor. While serving as Mayor, he was responsible for initiating several improvements in the City. He became a Nominated Member of the Legislative Council of Trinidad and Tobago for a three year term beginning 1928.

Clearly one of the greatest lawyers who practised in Trinidad and Tobago, he was a brilliant advocate and jurist with great forensic skill in the criminal branch of the law. His success at the bar has been phenomenal and at one stage, he had achieved the distinction of never having failed to obtain an acquittal for any of his clients in 40 years. Apart from his contributions at the municipal and Central Government levels, Sir Gaston served on several Boards and Committees, among them the Port of Spain Rent Assessment Board, the Boxing Board of Control and the Arima Race Club as President.

Sir Gaston is recognized as a distinguished son of the soil who made his mark in the spheres of law and politics.

Dr. Joseph Lennox Pawan, M.B.E.

Dr. Pawan attended St. Mary’s until 1907 when he won an Island Scholarship. After attaining degrees in Medicine and Surgery, he served in the First World War as Assistant Surgeon at the Colonial Hospital, Fort of Spain, and later as the District Medical Officer in Tobago and Cedros. In 1923, he was appointed bacteriologist to the Government. In the early 1930s, he achieved international acclaim for his discovery of the rabies virus transmitted by vampire bats and this spearheaded medical research in that area.

His breakthrough was the most significant achievement worldwide in that field, and he was awarded a MBE (Member of the British Empire) for this discovery, which was hailed a hallmark in tropical medicine. In addition to his work in bacteriology, he was also a pathologist who worked on several tuberculosis, malaria and tropical disease projects in the 1940s. He retired in 1953 and was appointed Honorary Consultant Bacteriologist to the Anglo-American Caribbean Commission Medical Centre. He was the author of a number of important papers and articles especially in the field of rabies.

Mr. Raymond Quevedo (Atilla the Hun), H.B.M.

Raymond Quevedo had excellent literary skills and was well known as a writer, orator and calypsonian. He was born in 1892 and later won a scholarship to attend St. Mary’s. He made his first public appearance as a calypsonian in 191 1, using the sobriquet ‘Atilla the Hun’. His career as a calypsonian ran for almost fifty years during which he was acknowledged as the calypso king of Trinidad on seven occasions. His familiarity with literary classics, his wide vocabulary and his ability to compose extemporaneously, resulted in him being regarded as a calypsonian par excellence, with one writer describing him as the Shakespeare of Calypso.

Quevedo was a fierce defender of the calypso art form and the traditional rights of the calypsonian to comment fearlessly on local and world affairs. UWI’s Dr. Gordon Rohlehr lists over 66 calypsoes composed and sung by Atilla, covering a wide range of topics including social justice and humour. Among his unforgettable compositions are Graf Zeppelin, Emancipation Centenary and Man Santapee.

He entered politics in 1946 winning a seat in the Port of Spain City Council, later serving as Deputy Mayor. In 1950 he was elected to the Legislative Council, winning a seat in the national elections. He was President General of the Trinidad Labour Party served on the Carnival Improvement Committee, the Railway Board and other civic organizations. He continued his profession as a calypsonian while carrying out his official duties and developed a reputation as a champion of the poor and a fighter for social reform.

Errol Hill wrote the foreword to one of Atilla’s books ‘A short history of Trinidad Calypso’ and the following extract from that foreword reproduced below, tells a great deal about Atilla.

“I feel that Atilla would like to be remembered most for his unshakeable faith in the destiny of the calypso. He believed passionately that it would outlive its detractors and be hailed as a significant expression of a people’s culture, and he enshrined these sentiments in a verse which he improvised in the calypso tent one night as the ever-watchful policeman was sedulously monitoring his song:

There are police spies sitting around
Taking shorthand notes of my song
But I can tell them independently
That they can tell their masters for me
Never mind whatever measures are employed
Kalso is art and cannot be destroyed
And centuries to come I’d have them know
People will be still singing kaiso.

The high regard in which Atilla was held is reflected in this obituary in the Nation news paper when he died in 1962. “he concerned himself with commentaries on our social and political life, on contemporary developments at home or abroad. His language was grandiloquent, his wit unrivalled, his courage boundless, his perception acute.” (Credits to Errol Hill from whose foreword to Atillas book we quoted extensively.)

Mr. Clifford Roach, H.B.M.

Clifford Archibald Roach was one of the pioneers of West Indies cricket. He was born on March 13, 1904 and died April 1988 at 84 years.

His death marked the last remaining member of the historic 1928 cricket team which toured England. He has been referred to as ‘a swashbuckling opener’. He gained cricket immortality when he became the first West Indian to score a century and double century in West Indies Test cricket. His 112 was scored at Kensington, Barbados, while his 209 was amassed in a day at Bourda, Guyana (in the first and third Tests of that series). In the second Test, Roach bagged a pair, another regional first, at his home ground, the Queen’s Park Oval. Those were his only hundreds in 16 Tests during which he scored 952 runs at an average of 30.70. Roach appeared in 16 Tests for the West Indies between 1925 and 1935.

He was also excelled in football, representing Maple, and Trinidad and Tobago in many inter colonial matches. He later studied law in England and became a Solicitor. Previously, he served as a City Councillor in the city of Port of Spain.

In 1972, he received the Humming Bird Medal (Gold) at the national honours ceremony for his great achievements in the field of cricket and was inducted in WITCO Hall of Fame in 1986.

Hall of Fame 1999

 
Mr. Kelvin ‘Pa’ Aleong, C.M.
Dr. Andre Joseph Cipriani
Mr. Ray Edwin Dieffenthaller, C.M.
Dr. Aldwin G. Francis, C.M.
Mr. Joseph Anthony ‘Joey’ Gonsalves
Fr. Arthur Lai Fook, C.S.Sp., C.M.
Dr. Patrick Solomon, T.C.
Fr. Pedro Valdez, C.S.Sp., C.M.
Mr. Wilfred (Sonny) Vincent Brown
Mr. Louis Anthony Wharton, K.C.

 

Mr. Kelvin ‘Pa’ Aleong, C.M.

 


 

Kelvin ‘Pa’ Aleong was a dedicated and loyal son of CIC who made many a personal sacrifice to facilitate and ensure the development of St. Mary’s and national cricketers. His contribution to the development of sport in general and cricket in particular, at St. Mary’s has ensured that the College continues to achieve one of its major objectives, that of producing well-rounded citizens. After graduating from dC, he was involved in coaching at the College for over 25 years and during that time, he inspired many cricketers to realize their full potential. Among the several CIC students who benefitted from his coaching were some who went on to represent the West Indies, including Willie Rodriguez, brothers Bryan and Charlie Davis, Bernard Julien and Richard Gabriel. Many proteges of his also represented Trinidad and Tobago and these include the three Furlonge brothers, Carl,Hammond and Kenny, Richard de Souza, Andrew Clarke and Kenny Roberts. Two examples of the positive impact of his coaching are the fact that CIC was generally among the top three teams in the Senior Grade when the colleges still played against seasoned cricketers in the Trinidad Cricket Council, and also that upon the resumption of intercol cricket in 1959, the Saints won the North and National titles for 10 consecutive years. His passion for the improvement of cricket in Trinidad took him to the club grounds of Queens Park, Maple and Harvard where he coached some national players such as Andy Ganteaume, Selwyn Caesar and some QRC players. His sons obviously inherited his sporting skills with Andy representing Trinidad at both football and cricket and Eddy representing the West Indies at football.

Dr. Andre Joseph Cipriani



Dr. Cipriani was born on April 2, 1908. He entered St.Mary’s College in October 1918, and obtained his School Certificate in 1924. He won the Stollmeyer Silver medal in 1925 and the Science Scholarship in July 1927. He entered McGill University, Canada on a Trinidad Island Scholarship where he studied physics and medicine. He began his research career at McGill and the Montreal Neurological Institute, before moving on to the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps. He joined the Chalk River Nuclear laboratories where he, with one W.V Mayneord, selected cobalt-60 as the most promising isotope for cancer treatment. André Cipriani pioneered the production of cobalt-60 which allowed treatments to begin in Canada in 1951. He was instrumental in setting standards for radiation hazards control and safe reactor operation at the Chalk River Nuclear Labs. He died at Deep River Ontario on February 23 1956 at age 47.

Mr. Ray Edwin Dieffenthaller, C.M.



Ray Dieffenthaller was born on January 23rd 1901 on Queen Street and attended Western Boys School (Park Street) and St. Thomas’ Boys’ School (now Rosary). He won an exhibition to St. Mary’s College and attended here from 1913 to 1917 when his academic career was cut short by the death of his mother. He started his working life at age 16 after her death, he founded Hardware and Oilfield Equipment Limited in 1941 at age 40, arid remained as Managing Director for 49 years. He was a very generous man with a strong social conscience and assisted the work of the Chest and Heart Association and the Coterie of Social Workers. A staunch Catholic, he was ‘a major donor to Catholic charities and was a major fund raiser for various church projects’ including the establishment of the seminary and the renovation of Archbishop’s House. He was a director of Trinidad Cement Limited, the Cooperative Bank from 1945 to 1963, Colonial Life and Barclays Bank. He was awarded the Chaconia Medal in 1978. He died in January 1990.

Dr. Aldwin G. Francis, C.M.



Dr. Francis was born on 16th October, 1898. He attended St. Mary’s College winning an Island scholarship in 1918. He qualified as a medical practitioner in Ireland and later specialised in Internal Medicine. He was a member of the Medical Board for many years, president of the Civil Service Association and a member of the Public Service Commission in 1953-56 and again in 1959-60. A keen and competent sportsman in several disciplines, he was Island Chess Champion in 1937 and 1939, and represented this country at chess. He, along with Errol dos Santos, Learie Constantine and Lindsay Grant, was instrumental in forming the Trinidad Cricket Council, of which he was president. He was a member of the council of the Football Association, and president of Maple Club from 1940 to 1964. He was also a national tennis champion in doubles. He also served on the Management Committee of the CIC Past Students Union. He was awarded the Chaconia Medal Gold for his contributions to medicine and public service. He died on May 22nd 1974.

Mr. Joseph Anthony ‘Joey’ Gonsalves



Joseph (Joey) Gonsalves was born on Decenber 4th 1925 in Woodbrook and attended Nelson Street Boys and then St. Mary’s College from 1939 to 1944. He first played for CIC against QRC in 1941 at the age of 16 years. He was goalkeeper and captain of the CIC football team in 1943. He was selected for the national (colony) team to tour Barbados in 1944, and was made captain of the national football team in 1948 and led the team until 1953. He was also an accomplished cricketer, playing as wicket-keeper-batsman for Queens Park. He played for Shamrock and for Notre Dame, and was a member of the coaching staff at CTC for over a decade. He is regarded by knowledgeable football fans as the best goalkeeper ever in Trinidad and Tobago as exemplied by the fact that because of his extraordinary anticipation and positioning, he rarely had to dive to make a save.

Fr. Arthur Lai Fook C.S.Sp. C.M.



Born in 1919, Arthur Lai Flook attended Nelson Street R.C. School, Tranquillity Boys’ Intermediate School and lere Central High School. He entered St. Mary’s in1930 on an exhibitIon from the Government. His scholastic career at St. Mary’s (as later his university career) was a distinguished one. In 1933 he was fifth in the Junior Cambridge examination and was awarded a house scholarship. In the following year he won the Jerningham Silver Medal for coming first in the same exam. In 1935, he won the Jerningham Book Prize for first place in the Cambridge School Certificate examination arid in 1936 he vas second to one Ellis Clarke in his first attempt at the Open Scholarship. In 1937, he won the Open Island Scholarship (in mathematics) and the Jerningham Gold Medal. During his career at CIC he was twice awarded a General Merit Medal for excelling in all College activities combined. After teaching for a year al the College, he left for France in 1938 to enter the Holy Ghost Novitiate, where he was professed on September 8, 1939. The next 6 years were spent at the holy Ghost Missionary College, Dublin. In 1942, he got the B.Sc. (with first class honours) in Mathematics and Mathematical Physics at University College, Dublin. In 1943 the MSc. (first class honours) and the Higher Diploma in Education; and in 1944 the BA. (first class honours) in Philosophy. In 1945 he went to the University of Fribourg in Switzerland for theology getting the S.T.B. summa cum laude. 11e was ordained priest in 1947 and returned to Trinidad the following year. During his stint at St. Mary’s, he lived up to his reputation as a scholar, the Higher Certificate/Advanced Level boys in particular benefiting from his mathematical ability. It can safely be said that he was responsible For coaching many of the students who won Island Scholarships for St. Mary’s over the years. But it was not only as a teacher that he used his gifts, he found time to keep up a constant study of theology philosophy and social science and used this to advantage in study clubs and discussion groups. In the 1960’s he was appointed as Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of Nigeria. He later became the second Trinidadian and last Student to be appointed as Principal of St. Mary’s, a position in which he served from 1971 to 1978.

Dr. Patrick Solomon, T.C.



Patrick Solomon was born in Newtown, Port of Spain, in 1908. He attended Tranquility Boys’ before proceeding to St. Mary’s College where he won an Island Scholarship in 1928 and later studied medicine at Queen’s University, Belfast, and at Edinburgh, graduating in 1934. He practised medicine in the United Kingdom until 1939, and then worked in the Leeward Islands medical service from 1939 to 1943. He returned to Trinidad and entered politics in 1943. He won a seat in the Legislative Council in the 1946 elections, but was defeated in the 1950 elections. His stint in the Legislative Council at that time was famous for his Minority Report on constitutional reform, which advocated dispensing with the nominated system and an Executive Council drawn entirely from members of the elected legislature. He again won office in the 1956 elections. He was a founding member and deputy political leader of the PNM (1956-1966) and served as Minister of Education, famously as minister of Home Affairs and Minister of External Affairs between 1956 and 1966. During his tenure as a government minister, he engaged the Catholic Church and CIC. He was later to become very close to the Church and the College. He entered the diplomatic service in 1966 as permanent representative to the United Nations (1966-1971), and High Commissioner in London 1971-1976. In later years, he would be instrumental in the establishment of DRETCHI, an organization formed to assist the deaf. He died on August 26th 1997 at age 89.

Fr. Pedro Valdez, C.S.Sp., C.M.



Pedro Valdez was born in 1913 and attended St. Mary’s College in 1923, where he won the Jerningham
Silver Medal for being first in the country in the Junior Cambridge examination in 1928, took first place again in the Senior Cambridge the following year and followed it up by winning the Science Island Scholarship at his first attempt, in 1930. His interests at CIC were not merely books, as he was among other things, an energetic sea-scout and Chancellor Flag patrol leader. On leaving CIC, he entered the priesthood in Paris and a year later, began his philosophical and university studies in Ireland. At University, he obtained the B.Sc. with Honours in Mathematical Science and the following year he got the B.A. in Spanish and Education. He then went for his theological studies in Switzerland where he was ordained to the priesthood, returning home to St. Mary’s in 1939. He was invaluable as a teacher and his psychological insight made him much sought after as a spiritual director and adviser. He was also a proficient organist, an amateur painter, director of the College Camera Club and Area Commissioner of Scouts in North Trinidad for some years. He was appointed by Archbishop Finbar Ryan to spearhead the negotiations with the Government on the matter of retaining the denominational character of the assisted schools. The result of those negotiations was the Concordat. He was the first Trinidadian and CIC Past Student to be appointed Principal of the College, serving with distinction from 1957 to 1971. During his tenure as Principal, he undertook the construction of the Centenary Hall and taught Physics to the Sixth Form class whilst ensuring that the college maintained its standards of excellence. He died in 1989.

Mr. Wilfred (Sonny) Vincent Brown



Much of the success that St. Mary’s College enjoyed in intercol football (and there were many) in the period 1940 to 1964 when Intercol supremacy was competed for among six colleges only, can be attributed to this inductee. In fact, his name is synonymous with football coaching at St. Mary’s. He attended St. Mary’s and represented the College from age 15 and then Trinidad from 1923 to 1931. He coached the St. Mary’s team from 1940 to 1963 during which time CIC won Intercol on many occasions, including eight consecutive victories against QRC from 1943 to 1950. His spirit of self-sacrifice and loyalty to the Alma Mater is well known and his influence on the many CIC students with whom he came into contact, created a positive impact on them both on and off the field, thus helping to shape their characters. He was Vice-President of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association from 1939 to 1970 and was also involved in women’s hockey and horseracing. A number of his proteges went on to wear national colours among whom are Willie Rodriguez and Eddie Aleong who also represented the West Indies football team. Other students of his who graduated to the national team were Andy Aleong, Sedley Joseph, Jeff Gellineau and Tyrone de la Bastide.

Mr. Louis Anthony Wharton, K.C.



This legal luminary was born on 25th August 1861 and won the Island Scholarship for CIC in 1879. He attended London University and was called to the bar at Gray’s Inn in 1884. He established his law practice first in San Fernando and then moved to Port of Spain. He gained a reputation as a highly successful lawyer who had the highest respect of his professional colleagues and public officials. He was involved in all the big cases of the time and his success at the bar was deemed to be extraordinary. He was awarded the King’s Counsel (KC) in 1905. Described as a ‘fervent Catholic’, he was a member of the Board of Education, the College Council and a Commission on Education. He was a loyal and devoted alumnus of St. Mary’s College who was involved in all aspects of the life of the college. He died on 20th August, 1915.

Hall of Fame 2003

 
Professor Emmanuel Amoroso, T.C.,C.B.E.
Professor Courtenay Bartholomew, C.M.
Mr. William (Willie) V. Clerk
Mr. Charles (Charlie) Davis, H.B.M.
Justice Michael de la Bastide, T.C., Q.C.
Mr. J. Hamilton Holder, C.M.
Dr. Alistair Karmody
Fr. Gerard Pantin, T.C., C.S.Sp.
Mr. Andre Tanker, C.M.

Professor Emmanuel Amoroso, T.C.,C.B.E.

Professor Emmanuel Amoroso is regarded by many as the most distinguished professor of Trinidad birth in the field of medical science and research. After graduating from St. Mary’s College, he entered University College, Dublin to study medicine. His career was one of great distinction, not only in his contribution to scientific knowledge, but in the number and variety of honours that were bestowed upon him. He had a record of academic success as a medical student at University College, Dublin and after periods of study in Berlin and at University College, London, joined the Royal Veterinary College in 1934 as Senior Assistant in charge of histology and embryology. In 1947 he was appointed to the chair of Veterinary Physiology at the College.His outstanding contribution lay in the field of reproductive biology although his interests and research covered an enormously diverse number of topics. He published many papers and stimulating reviews, but much of his thought and original work was summarized in his classic chapter in Marshall’s Physiology of Reproduction. One of his many achievements lay in his support of the learned societies with which he concerned himself and several of these benefi ted directly from his financial acumen. As a chairman of scientific meetings, he had the ability to distil complex argument for evidence and to present a summary that was both lucid and elegant. He was fluent in several languages. On his retirement, he was given an Emeritus Professorship and the college made him a Fellow. However, retirement merely marked a stage in his active career and was followed by a series of visiting Professorships and other posts (in Santiago, Sydney, Nairobi, Guelph) and by a long period as Special Professor in the University of Nottingham. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society and a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, Fellow of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Fellow of the Royal Society of Pathologists, Honorary Associate of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons and the holder of many honorary degrees from universities the world over.He received the Mary Marshall Medal from the Society for the Study of Fertility and the Carl Hartman Medal from the Society for the Study of Reproduction. The presentation of the Dale Medal by the Society for Endocrinology, at the symposium held to honour his 80th birthday, gave him particular pleasure. He ensured that he gave back to the land of his birth in various ways, among them by serving as an advisor in the inner councils of the University of the West Indies. He was also an indefatigable worker as a member of the Task Force for the Mount Hope Medical Complex, and through his many international contacts in the field of medicine, many notable experts came to advise the Task Force.In his youth, he was an avid sportsman, representing both St. Mary’s and the illustrious Maple Club in the Port of Spain Football League. At university he was a competent boxer. In 1969 he was awarded the C.B.E. by the Queen and in 1977 the Trinity Cross.

Professor Courtenay Bartholomew, C.M.

After winning a House Scholarship from St. Mary’s, Professor Courtenay Bartholomew chose to study medicine in Dublin and graduated from University College, Dublin (UCD) in 1960.Professor Bartholomew has been involved in academic medicine ever since graduation and is the only medical academician in the Caribbean to be awarded Honorary Fellowships by the three Royal Colleges – the Royal Colleges of Physicians of Ireland, Edinburgh and London. In 2002, he was awarded University College of Dublin’s highest recognition, Fellow of University College, Dublin. In 1967 he was recruited from the Royal Victoria Hospital of Mc Gill University to inaugurate the first medical school of the University of the West Indies in Trinidad and Tobago, and in 1977 he became UWI’s first Professor of Medicine of Trinidadian birth. He is the Emeritus Professor of Medicine of the University of the West Indies and Director or the Medical Research Centre and Foundation of Trinidad and Tobago. He has made an outstanding contribution to the School of Medicine through the quality of his leadership, as was stated in the citation delivered when he was admitted to membership of the Royal College of Physicians in London. He has been recognized internationally in the fi eld of science and more recently for his research on retroviruses. He reported the fi rst cases of AIDS in the Commonwealth Caribbean in 1983 and since then he has been collaborating with the US research team of Dr. Robert Gallo, who co-discovered the AIDS virus in 1984. His research centre in Trinidad was also recently selected to be one of the first 11 international sites to conduct HIV vaccine trials. He has over 70 publications in scientific journals and is the author of chapters in eight textbooks of medicine. His latest book, Life, AIDS and Terrorism – The Link, will be soon AIDS and Terrorism – The Link, will be soon AIDS and Terrorism – The Link published in the United States. He has also written four religious books on Mariology, has spearheaded the restoration of four churches in Trinidad and Tobago and has designed all the stained glass windows of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception and St. Francis Church in Belmont.In 1975, he was awarded the Independence Day Chaconia Medal (Gold) for long and meritorious service in the fi eld of medicine. In 1984, the Trinidad Guardian newspapers voted him “Achiever of the Year” and he was the Trinidad Express “Individual of the Year” in 1985. In 2001, he was the recipient of the Republic Day Award from Citizens for a Better Trinidad and Tobago “for his outstanding contribution to national development in medicine and for social and religious work”. His most recent recognition, in 2003 was the New York Independence Day award bestowed upon him in Brooklyn “for his positive contribution to this country’s cultural heritage”.

Mr. William (Willie) V. Clerk

William (Willie) Clerk can truly be said to have been a great champion of the poor. This tribute was earned out of the many dedicated years of service that he gave to the St. Vincent de Paul Society, which he joined in 1943. He was later elected as President of the Society and is regarded as the person largely responsible for the growth it enjoyed. In keeping with the spirit of the founder of the Society, Frederick Ozanam, it was his fervent wish that young men would be recruited into the conferences. He shared with the late Count Finbar Ryan, Archbishop of Port of Spain, a vision that a conference be established in every parish of the archdiocese. Both of these goals were accomplished during his presidency of the Society – a testimony to the inspiration and example of one who, though successful in business, was never too busy to serve his fellowman. His disciplined leadership, both in business and in the work of the St. Vincent de Paul Society, characterized the spirit with which he was imbued as a student at St. Mary’s College, where he taught for a short time upon graduation. In 1926, he joined the firm then known as Massy Limited as a cashier/customs clerk. From that time onward, he played a vital role in laying the foundation of what was to become Neal and Massy Holdings Limited, one of the largest conglomerates in the Caribbean and which he headed as chairman until 1976. Throughout his business career, he was respected by everyone who had contact with him, for his disciplined leadership, integrity and ability. His influence on the lives of many is written indelibly in the records of Neal and Massy’s growth and development over half a century.In his own silent way, he devoted much of his spare time to the poor and the lonely who relied on him for relief in their distress. He recognized the need for warm humanity and to give material assistance with some sense of dignity. Indeed, he was generous with his time, his possessions and himself. In 1975, he received a Papal award, Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice from Pope Paul VI, in recognition of his outstanding and dedicated work in the Church and the St. Vincent de Paul Society for over 30 years. He also served as President of the St. Mary’s College Past Students’ Union from 1953 to 1956.

Mr. Charles (Charlie) Davis, H.B.M.

Charles ‘Charlie’ Davis grew up in the days when many sportsmen in Trinidad and Tobago successfully participated in two or three sporting disciplines during the year. Besides being a table tennis doubles champion of Trinidad and Tobago, he played fi rst eleven cricket and football for St. Mary’s in the days when college students competed against older players in the various national leagues. He was a determined footballer who played Intercol football for two years, with the last occasion being remembered for the fact that during the North semi-final, he had to substitute for the goal keeper who suffered a broken finger. He had a fierce loyalty for St. Mary’s, a loyalty which often inspired CIC teams to victory over stronger opponents. Representing St. Mary’s at cricket, together with another outstanding allround sportsman, Andy Aleong, he formed what was fondly referred to as “the cricketing twins of CIC”. For three years, they were the scourge of experienced bowlers in the Senior Grade of the Trinidad Cricket Council, scoring numerous centuries against teams such as Maple, Malvern, Sporting Club and Invincible. Needless to say, he often reserved his best for QRC, our arch-rivals of over a century, laying the foundation for St. Mary’s emerging victorious in the Cadbury Cup Intercol cricket tournament for the first ten consecutive years. In his final year at CIC, he scored over 1000 runs in the season. While still at St. Mary’s, he represented North Trinidad in the annual North-South Beaumont Cup classic and also gained selection on the Trinidad team to play in the regional tournament, with his best performance that year (age 17) being 127 and 97 against a Guyana team that included the great Lance Gibbs. But it was as a member of the West Indies team that he showed his determination and discipline which resulted in him being one of the most reliable West Indian batsmen of all times. This accolade was earned although he played for the West Indies at a time when the team was graced with players of the calibre of Sobers, Kanhai, Rowe and Lloyd, as he often had to rescue the team from near disaster. In two consecutive series, against India (1970-71) and New Zealand (1971-72) he finished ahead of his more illustrious colleagues in the batting averages. He was very much a player who put team before self as was evidenced by his declaration when he captained St. Mary’s in an Intercol final with his personal score at 196 not out, to ensure that his bowlers had enough time to bowl out the opposing team twice. His century at Lord’s in 1969 no doubt stands out as one of his most noteworthy achievements but it was against the formidable Indian spin trio in 1970-71 that he made his mark in West Indies cricket. That trio of Bedi, Venkat and Prasanna, continually exposed and destroyed the West Indies batsmen...all except him and his captain Sobers. His magnificent technique against top class spin bowling resulted in an average of 135 in that series. In the tour by New Zealand he played what is arguably one of the most valuable Test innings by a West Indian batsman, scoring 183 and in the process, transforming a losing situation into an honourable draw. He averaged 58.25 in that series.He was renowned for his courage, good judgement and reliability, all compensating for any shortage of natural sporting ability. In these times when sportsmen have many more opportunities than were available in earlier days, he stands out as a role model who can be held up as an example of one who by dint of determination and hard work, was able to achieve much on the world’s sporting stage. He was awarded the Humming Bird (Silver) in 1992.

Justice Michael de la Bastide, T.C., Q.C.

Justice Michael de la Bastide has a distinguished and impressive record of sporting, academic and professional excellence. He won the Island Scholarship in Languages in 1954, following which he secured the B.A. in Jurisprudence with First Class Honours from Oxford University in 1959. One year later, he attained his Bachelor of Civil Law, with First Class Honours, also at Oxford University. On the basis of his Bar final exam, he was awarded by his Inn, Gray’s Inn, the Cunningham Macaskie Scholarship and the James Mould Scholarship, having placed first among the candidates at that Inn. He was called to the English Bar in 1961 and was admitted to the local Bar that same year, having been appointed Crown Counsel. He resigned as Acting Senior Crown Counsel in 1963 to take up a place in the chambers of Mr. Malcolm Butt, Q.C. He was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 1975. Justice de la Bastide served as Treasurer of the Bar Association and was the first President of the Law Association of Trinidad and Tobago. He also served as an Independent Senator from 1976 to 1981 and was a member of the Constitution Commission appointed in 1987. He was senior partner of the firm of de la Bastide and Jacelon from 1992 to 1995, when he was appointed Chief Justice of Trinidad and Tobago, a position he occupied until his retirement at age 65 in 2002. He was made an Honorary Bencher of Gray’s Inn in 1996 and an Honorary Fellow of the Society for Advanced Legal Studies in 2000. During his 30 years at the Bar, he established himself as a most competent and formidable advocate, regarded by his colleagues as one of the best in the British Commonwealth. Justice Michael de la Bastide, T.C., Q.C. He also performed well in the field of sprt, representing St. Mary’s at tennis, hockey, football and cricket. He represented Trinidad and Tobago at hockey in 1971 and also at Bridge for several years. He held directorships in a number of the leading firms in this country and was a member of the Board of Management of St. Dominic’s Home for several years.As Chief Justice, his focus was the reduction of the backlog of cases and delays in the determination of matters, being fully aware of the adverse effects such a situation had on the administration of justice in the country. His initiatives resulted in a significant improvement in the administration of justice in this country. It must be noted that Chief Justice de la Bastide personally contributed to the improvements that were achieved, having written several judgments in the Court of Appeal himself. He was strong in defence of the independence of the judiciary and he used the combative skills for which he was known as an advocate to show that he was prepared to defend that independence at all costs. Without a doubt, Chief Justice de la Bastide left an indelible and positive mark on the administration of justice in Trinidad and Tobago. In 1979, he was nominated “Man of the Year” by the Express newspaper for what was described as “his dedication and fearless commitment to public service, particularly in respect of his outstanding contribution in the Senate”. He was awarded the Trinity Cross in 1996.

Mr. J. Hamilton Holder, C.M.

Mr. J. Hamilton Holder was a noted educationist, who after graduating from St. Mary’s College, entered the teaching profession in 1931. After formal training at the Catholic Training College, he taught at his alma mater for two years. He then pioneered correspondence or distance education, by establishing the Progressive Correspondence College for Teachers in 1936, before founding Progressive Educational Institute in 1946. Progressive Educational Institute and other private secondary schools at that time filled a critical void caused by the fact that the few established colleges and girls’ secondary schools did not provide enough secondary school places for students coming out of the primary schools. At that time, the several Government Secondary schools which now exist had not yet been established, so that prior to them coming on stream in the late 1960s, Progressive and other private secondary schools were the source of a high standard of secondary education for thousands. Thus it is that secondary schools such as Progressive, enabled hundreds of students to acquire secondary level education that would not have been possible otherwise. It is to the credit of a pioneer and risk-taker such as J. Hamilton Holder, that many of the graduates of his private secondary school went on to successful careers where they made tangible contributions to this country and other countries. Among the noted graduates are former Chief Justice Clinton Bernard, as well as High Court Judges, doctors, lawyers, national sportsmen and public servants. In addition, a number of students completed their education at the more established schools after starting at Progressive. Evidence of the high standard of education provided at Progressive was the fact that one of his students, Clifford Payne, won the Jerningham Silver medal, placing fi rst among all secondary school students in the Senior Cambridge examinations and five other students won House scholarships on various occasions.Mr. Holder was a strict disciplinarian but he was also a gentle individual who sought the interest of his students at all times. He strove always for excellence and inspired his students to do likewise. At the same time that he was making his contribution to education, he served as an Alderman in the Port of Spain City Council between 1957 and 1971, being Mayor for the last three years. As Mayor, he initiated the twinning of Port of Spain with the city of St. Catherine’s in Canada. He served as Vice-President of the Senate from 1976 to 1981. He also shared his wide experience with his colleagues by serving as President of the Private Secondary Schools Association. He was the recipient of numerous awards, with the most prestigious being the Chaconia Medal (Gold) for his services to education. He died in December 2001.

Dr. Alistair Karmody

Dr. Alistair Karmody died at the relatively early age of 49 but by that time he was known internationally for his accomplishments in vascular surgery. At St. Mary’s College he won the Island Scholarship in Science in 1955 as well as the Jerningham Gold Medal for placing fi rst among all Higher Certificate students. Upon graduating from St. Mary’s he pursued studies in medicine at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, as well as at Oxford University. He later became a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in England and in Edinburgh, Scotland. In 1970 he was invited to join the Albany Veterans Administration Hospital and soon after, became a full-time member of the faculty of the medical school. At the medical school, his vitality, wide interests and publications, made him nationally known. There, he led a team of physicians in pioneering limb reattachment surgery, performing the fi rst such successful operation at that hospital when they reattached the foot of a two-and-a-half-year-old boy. He was also known internationally for his accomplishments in vascular surgery, co-pioneering with another doctor the in-situ vein by-pass graft. They established the procedure to relieve circulation problems in the leg by re-routing the blood supply past clogged arteries. That procedure is now standard technique throughout the world. At Albany, he also contributed significantly to the initiation of their kidney transplant programme. He wrote more than 150 scientific publications including numerous book chapters and articles published around the world. His lectures and dissertations were heard in countries around the world as well. Beside his intellectual qualities, he was an exceptionally talented technical surgeon and a most effective teacher, as evidenced by the achievements of many of his protégés. He was affiliated to a number of professional organizations, among them the American Surgical Association, the Society of Vascular Surgery, the International Cardiovascular Society and the New York Academy of Science. He died on June 19, 1986.

Fr. Gerard Pantin, T.C., C.S.Sp.


Fr. Gerard Pantin won a Government exhibition at Belmont Boys’ Intermediate school to enter St. Mary’s College. At CIC, he excelled in academics, winning the Island Scholarship for Science and the Jerningham Gold Medal in 1948 to cap a very consistent performance throughout his stay at the College. While doing extremely well academically, he participated fully in extra-curricular activities, performing with distinction in cricket, football and scouting. Upon graduating from St. Mary’s, he taught at his alma mater for one year before leaving to study for the priesthood. Entering the priesthood represented a career change, as his original goal was to pursue studies in medicine. Having made the switch, he applied himself conscientiously, as was his wont in all his endeavours. As he put it, “being a doctor, I could heal only the body; as a priest, I could heal the inner selves of my people”. He also achieved the B.Sc. (Honours) in Chemistry, Biochemistry and Botany, a Diploma in Education, a Diploma in Philosophy and a License in Theology. After his ordination, he was reassigned to St. Mary’s where he taught science subjects, served as Dean of Forms Five and Six, and competently carried out the role of Games Master for a number of years in the 1960s. During his stint as Games Master, St. Mary’s teams enjoyed a very high rate of success, particularly in Intercol football and cricket. They also performed well in the First Division of the North leagues for these two sports, when the College teams competed with and held their own against the senior teams of the day. He was the Founder and Co-ordinator of St. Anthony’s College (in 1968), the first comprehensive school in Trinidad, catering for special technological and science training for slow developers. In 1970 came perhaps the most defining period in his life, the aftermath of the 1970 uprising in Trinidad. At that time, thousands of underprivileged and unemployed marched through the streets, demanding justice and equality. As a priest, the events of that time made him determined to fi nd a way to assist the poor and he decided that one way to do that was to interact with the youth of Laventille. The organization that grew out of those early initiatives became what is today known as Servol. That organization is now one of the best organized NGOs in the country with some 50 Life Centres and 150 Early Childhood Centres. It provides employment for over 600 persons and educates over 7,000 adolescents and young children. In 1973 he founded the Trinidad and Tobago Development Foundation which guarantees loans for community projects. The work of Servol has been recognized internationally and, in fact, a number of other countries has sought advice from Fr. Pantin towards establishing similar programmes in their homelands. In 1994, UNESCO honoured Servol for its work in the area of early childhood and adolescent development programmes, listing it as one of the top 20 of their kind in the world. In 1994 he was awarded the alternative Nobel Prize, an award that carried with it a grant of approximately TT $480,000, all of which was used to further the work of the group. The citation for the award read in part “for showing the crucial importance of spiritual values, co-operation and family responsibility in addition to practical skills and achievements in building a civilized society”. He was awarded an Honorary degree by Duquesne University in 1987 and by the University of the West Indies in 1990. He was the winner of the Express Individual of the Year award in 1980. In 1995 he was awarded this country’s highest award, the Trinity Cross.

Mr. Andre Tanker, C.M.

On the surface, Mr. Andre Tanker was merely a musician, but it was a career that made him quite famous. However, the depth of his music was such that many regarded him as a modern day griot who reminded the people of Trinidad and Tobago of the struggle that made his nation great. It is accepted that music can have a tremendous influence on youth, either positive or negative, and he will always be remembered as one who used his gift of music to produce sobering, intelligent messages, to inspire youth and others. As Express journalist Debbie Jacob wrote in a ribute to him soon after his death, “Two themes oomed large in his music: our sense of spirituality as a people, and the need to provide a peaceful, meaningful life for our children. He believed hat children should get their dignity through heir history. He believed in a sense of humanity hat transcended race and religion. Out of that spirituality, came poignant messages of peace and freedom. His music had a sense of presence because it connected the past to the present. We were richer, wiser and lovelier because of him”. While still a teenager attending St. Mary’s College, Andre arranged a Pat Castagne composition for Invaders Steel Orchestra, and at age 17, he formed the Coronets combo, becoming one of the pioneers of combo music in Trinidad and Tobago. A few years later he formed the extremely popular Flamingoes combo, in which he successfully integrated conventional musical instruments with the steelband. Thereafter, he progressed into other aspects of the performing arts, when in 1970 he wrote the musical score for he widely acclaimed Ti Jean and His Brothers, a play written by Nobel Laureate, Derek Walcott. Andre also scored music for the USA production of Mustapha Matura’s Playboy of he West Indies and wrote the soundtrack for Earl Lovelace’s The Dragon Can’t Dance, which toured the Caribbean, England and Canada. Prior to that, he scored the music for the local movie Bim. In 1993, he added to his long list of accomplishments when he wrote the score for an adapted version of Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure, performed in Central Park, New York Measure, performed in Central Park, New York Measure City. Lyrics and music were equally important to him as evidenced in his classic composition, Ben Lion, which was a serious contender for the 2002 Carnival Road March, while delivering a satirical commentary on the tragedy of September 11, 2001. As columnist Debbie Jacobs went on to say, “He used vivid imagery, clever metaphors and puns to create allegory”. Indeed, his works qualify among those that can be used to teach the intricacies of Literature in a local setting. Although Andre Tanker was a very humble man, he had a tremendous influence on a number of local musicians, the younger ones as well as his contemporaries. He was influential because his music was eclectic, embracing every genre of Trinidadian rhythms, as well as those foreign. In spite of his many talents, he remained unpretentious and not entrapped by things materialistic, hence his willingness to give of himself at all times. He did receive a number of awards in recent years, including two Caciques, for best composer (1990), and best musical director (1995); and a Sunshine Award in 1992 for outstanding contribution to Caribbean music. Perhaps we can get a very good understanding of the man by quoting from tributes paid to him by Raffi que Shah: “In his passing, this country has lost a genius, a trailblazer supreme, one who was daring and talented enough to experiment with our various forms of music. His music contained healing properties, lyrics and soulful music that demanded from the society an end to schisms and racism”. And according Debbie Jacob: “He was the essence of what is good and pure and simple in all of us”. He was awarded the Chaconia Medal (Gold) in 2000. He died on February 28, 2003.

Hall of Fame 2001

 
Dr. Bert Achong
Dr. Henry ‘Harry’ Collymore, T.C., H.B.M.
Dr. Reynold Dolly, C.M.
Mr. Michael Hamel-Smith
Professor Collin Karmody
Dr. Roderick Marcano, T.C., O.B.E.
Mr. J. Hamilton Maurice, T.C.
Archbishop Anthony Pantin, T.C., C.S.S.P.
Dr. Theo Poon-King, C.M.
Mr. William ‘Willie’ Rodriguez, H.B.M.

 

Dr. Bert Achong

 


 

Dr. Bert Achong won the prestigious Jerningham Gold Medal in 1946 and studied medicine at University College, Dublin. He trained as a clinical pathologist at London’s Lambeth Hospital, and joined Virologist Sir Anthony Epstein’s team to study viruses associated with cancer. In 1964, the team discovered the first human tumour virus, known as the Epstein-Barr virus which has come to assume great significance in the treatment of cancer (oncology), tumour virology and immunology. Dr. Achong was renowned in electron microscopy and co-authored several books on the Epstein-Barrvirus. In 1971, he discovered the “foamy virus”, a member of the retrovirus family. He taught a Cellular Pathology BSc course, from which many scientists entered careers in research. He was a Foundation Fellow of the pathology faculty of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland and a fellow of Britain’s Royal College of Pathology. He was awarded both the Doctorate in Science (DSc) and the Doctorate in Medicine by the National University of Ireland and is one of a select group of Trinidadians so distinguished. He was born December 6, 1928 and died November 20, 1996.

Dr. Henry (Harry) Collymore T.C., H.B.M
 


 

Dr. Harry Collymore qualified as an orthopedic and plastic surgeon in 1951. After leaving St. Mary’s he studied at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital Medical College, London. He was a man of varied experience, having worked at the Imperial College of Tropical Agriculture (ICTA) at St. Augustine as an Analyst and the Pathological Laboratory in Port of Spain. He then joined Air Training Scheme in Canada and migrated to England as a Navigator. He later established the Langmore Health Foundation, an orthopedic and plastic surgery clinic operated primarily for the benefit of poor people. He was also instrumental in the establishment of the National Centre for Persons with Disabilities (1964) the Cheshire Foundation Home for the Sick (1967) and the Trinidad and Tobago Paraplegic Association (1968). He was involved in the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahai’s, the T&T Medical Association and the Rotary Club of Pointe-a-Pierre. He has received many awards for outstanding service in medicine and the community, including the Humming Bird Medal Gold in 1972 and the Trinity Cross in 2000. He was born in January 1918 and died February 2001.

Dr. Reynold Dolly, C.M.
 


His peers in the medical field described Dr. Dolly as “a man of kindness and dignity worthy of emulation.” No doubt this was due to the deep concern he always had for the health and welfare of his patients. After graduating from St. Mary’s, he went to London to study medicine and qualified as a member of the Royal College of Surgeons, a Licentiate of the College of Physicians and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Health. On his return to Trinidad, he served as a Medical Officer in San Fernando, Port of Spain and Tobago before joining Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd., where he retired as Chief Medical Officer. He made an invaluable contribution to medicine as a General Practitioner and also in the field of Obstetrics and General Surgery. He served on the Board of Texaco Incorporated, was President of the T&T Medical Association, Chairman of the Mental Health Association, a member of the Red Cross Society and founding member of the Rotary Club of San Fernando. Many sportsmen (soccer, cricket and track and field) benefited from his assistance and interest in sports. He was awarded the Chaconia Medal Gold for his contributions in the field of medicine. He was born on July 23, 1909 and died January 6, 1999.

Mr. Michael Hamel-Smith



 

Mr. Hamel-Smith was called to the Bar in 1909. He was a Solicitor, a Conveyancer and Notary Public and immediately upon qualifying as a Solicitor, he started his own firm. He overcame many social pressures to make a significant career for himself, by dint of personal virtues such as integrity, generosity and a creative approach to business. The law firm which he founded in 1909, M. Hamel-Smith & Co. Ltd., withstood the many challenges it faced during World War I and has survived to be one of the leading firms in the Caribbean today. He was a member of the Council of the Incorporated Law Society of Trinidad and Tobago on which he served as Vice-President for many years. He took a leading part in the struggle for Catholic Training Colleges for Teachers and their establishment is due in part to his efforts. He was devoted to his alma mater, and his interest in every phase of college life continued long after he left college. He was, until his death, a member of the Provisional Committee of the Past Students Union which benefited from his organisational skills. He was born on December 6, 1883 and died on November 2, 1933.

Professor Collin Karmody



 

Professor Karmody is currently the Head of Ear, Nose and Throat Department at Tufts University, School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts. He first attended Naparima College in San Fernando, then transferred to St. Mary’s. He did his under-graduate studies in Dublin, Ireland where he won a Gold Medal. On graduating, he went to London where he achieved his fellowship and specialised in Ear, Nose and Throat medicine. He has gained considerable recognition in the United States for his research at Tufts University and at Harvard University. He has also proven to be a skilled surgeon and in 1989 was responsible for the first ever “bionic’ ear operation on a profoundly deaf patient in New England. This procedure was a cochlea implant, which restored hearing nerve fibres. He is currently an external examiner for the Royal College of Surgeons, London. In 1999, the title of Professor Emeritus was bestowed on him by Tufts University in recognition of thirty years of dedicated and outstanding service in the field of medicine.

Dr. Roderick Marcano, T.C., O.B.E.



Dr. Marcano won an Island Scholarship at St. Mary’s College in 1918 and proceeded to London University where he graduated as MRCS and LRCP in 1924; MB and BS in 1926; DPH and MD with Distinction in 1931; and MRCP in 1932. He did postgraduate studies at various hospitals in London, particularly with respect to ear, nose and throat and ophthalmic studies, as well as Public Health. He engaged in private practice up to 1937 when he was appointed Medical Officer of Health, Port of Spain. In spite of his academic and professsional brilliance, he remained a humble man, committed to helping his fellowman, often at great sacrifice to himself. He held office in many organisations including President of Trinidad Legion, President - Child Welfare League, Vice-President of the Medical Board of T&T, Vice-President of the Trinidad Amateur Athletic Association, Representative of the Council of Trinidad Legion British Empire Service League, The Boxing Board of Control, Sports Stadium Committee, Trinidad and Tobago Olympic Committee, Tuberculosis Association, Opticians Board, Slum Clearance Committee and the Probation Board. He served with the Caribbean Forces during the 2nd World War as Medical Officer and as a Major. Dr. Marcano was awarded the OBE for meritorious military services and the Trinity Cross for distinguished service to Trinidad & Tobago. He was the President of the St. Mary’s College Past Students’ Union from 1950 to 1953.

Mr. J. Hamilton Maurice, T.C.



J. Hamilton Maurice has had significant impact on the education system of this country, both through his quality teaching and his administrative skills. After completing his education at St. Mary’s, he became one of the first local students to obtain an external degree, from London University. Having secured his B.A. in education, he took over a private secondary school which his father ran in San Fernando. In 1920 he transferred his students to Naparima College and assumed the position of Assistant Master there. Some years later, he was appointed Assistant Lecturer at the Government Training College for Teachers. He was Assistant Inspector of Schools (Trinidad) in 1938 and Inspector of Schools (Tobago) in 1941. While in Tobago, he received a British Council scholarship towards a Diploma in Education, in London. On his return from England, he served as Director of Education in Dominica from 1947 to 1955. He returned to Trinidad as a Master at Naparima College. He went on to train teachers at the Naparima Teachers College and at the Emergency Training College for Teachers. As the Associate Editor at the Port of Spain Gazette and the Chronicle, he made valuable contributions to the field of journalism. In 1956 he became part of a crucial nucleus which created the People’s National Movement under Dr. Williams. He was appointed the first President of the Senate, a position he held from 1961 to 1971. As a member of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Committee, he was required to visit many Commonwealth Parliaments. In his last official role as Chairman of the Maurice Commission on Education, he produced a Report which made critical recommendations for education at primary, secondary and university levels in this country. In 1972, he was a member of the Constitution Reform Commission. He was decorated with the Queen’s Coronation Medal in 1953 and later the Trinity Cross. He was born on August 14, 1899 and died July 23, 1988.

Archbishop Anthony Pantin, T.C., C.S.Sp.



Archbishop Pantin chose as his episcopal motto, “Omni Omnibus” — all things to all men. At his death, Cardinal Bernard Law, Archbishop of Boston, said ‘the ease and openness with which he dealt with everyone, gave eloquent testimony to the fact that that was not just a motto, but the very model upon which he based his episcopal ministry”. After graduating from St. Mary’s in 1946, Anthony Pantin joined the Holy Ghost Congregation and while studying for the priesthood, he taught at St. Mary’s for three years. He was ordained as a priest in 1956 and was assigned to the island of Guadeloupe. He was appointed Superior of the Holy Ghost congregation at St. Mary’s in 1965 and three years later, created history when he was ordained as the first local Archbishop of Port of Spain. Paying tribute to him at his death, President Robinson said, “under the late Archbishop, the Church has come to be seen as more sensitive to the needs of society and more in keeping with the aspirations of our nation, which as declared in our Constitution, is founded under God”. He shared his wisdom and guidance with many organisations including the Caribbean Conference of Churches and the Inter-Religious Organisation of which he was a founding member and President for a number of years. He was well known for his commitment to Caribbean ecumenism. In times of national crisis, he could be counted on to minister to the populace at large, two notable occasions being the disturbances in 1970 and 1990. In the year 2000, he was awarded the Trinity Cross for his loving service to the people of Trinidad and Tobago. His life can be appropriately summed up by quoting from the condolence message sent to the Archdiocese by Pope John Paul II: “What he brought to his people as Pastor was love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control”. He was born on August 27, 1929 and died March 12, 2000.

Dr. Theo Poon-King, C.M.



Theo Poon King won a House Scholarship in 1942. He won an Island Scholarship (first in his Group) in 1946 and 1947. (He was deprived of the Scholarship in 1946 because of the then newly established criterion that he did not obtain a Distinction in one of the subjects he took.) In 1947, he established a new high for total marks in the Modern Literary Group, with his examination subjects being Greek, Latin, French and Greek and Roman History. He studied at University College, Dublin and St. Vincent’s Hospital, Dublin where he graduated with First Class Honours at the top of the class and with three Gold Medals in Medicine and Surgery in 1953. In 1955 he attained the BSc (Honours) in Pathology and Physiology. He was Specialist Physician at the San Fernando General Hospital from 1958-1998 and Head, Streptococcal Disease Unit there for over 34 years. He did post-graduate work in Cardiology at Harvard. In 2000, he was honoured as the Medical Researcher of the Century in Trinidad, for his significant contributions to medical research for over 40 years, in areas such as mycocarditis from scorpion stings, diabetes, streptococci and acute rheumatic fever. His other areas of research include coronary heart disease, yellow fever and paraquat poisoning. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, Fellow of the American College of Physicians, Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and several other professional societies. The National University of Ireland conferred a Doctorate in Medicine on him in 1972 and three years later, he was awarded the Chaconia Medal, Gold for his contribution to medicine. In 1983, Pope John Paul Il awarded him the Papal Medal for services to medicine and the Church, and in 1955 the Commonwealth Caribbean Medical Research Council gave him an Award for ‘distinguished medical research in the Caribbean”.

Mr. William ‘Willie’ Rodriguez, H.B.M.



Willie Rodrigues played first eleven cricket and football for St. Mary’s during his last four years at school. In those days, the Colleges played in the senior leagues against their elders. He made his debut on the senior Trinidad cricket team in his penultimate year at St. Mary’s and after a break of a few years, represented Trinidad from 1957 to 1970. He captained Trinidad from 1960 to 1967. He gained selection to the West Indies team in 1958 to tour India and Pakistan. He played in the home series against India in 1962 and in England in the 1963 Test series. He was the first bowler to reach the 50 wicket mark in regional Shell Shield cricket and still holds the record for the lowest runs per wicket, for bowlers with more than 50 wickets in regional cricket. He later became a cricket administrator, being a selector and manager of the Trinidad cricket team. He was the manager of the West Indies team to Australia and New Zealand in 1979-1980, the first West Indies team to win a series in Australia. During his top cricketing years, he continued to star at football until he left the game in 1960 because of injury. He was a fixture on both North and Trinidad football teams and it was no surprise when he was selected on the West Indies football team in 1958. He has the signal honour of being the only individual who has represented the West Indies at both football and cricket. Up to the late 1970’s, he was a valuable part of the St. Mary’s coaching staff. He is the President of Queen’s Park Cricket Club and was awarded the Humming Bird Medal, Silver in 1995. He was born on 25th June 1934.

 

Hall of Fame 2005

 
Mr. Wayne Berkeley, H.B.M.
Mr. Fenrick De Four, C.M.
Bishop Malcolm Galt, C.S.Sp.
Professor Emeritus Dr. Kenneth S. Julien, T.C.
Dr. Hollis Liverpool, H.B.M.
Mr. George Padmore (Malcolm Nurse)
Mr. Christopher Thomas, C.M.

Mr. Wayne Berkeley, H.B.M

Mr. Wayne Berkeley, H.B.M. has become known for the professionalism of his designs and theatrical productions over the years and is now one of this country’s leading artists. While Mr. Berkeley was at St. Mary’s College in the 1950’s, art had no place in the official curriculum, but he grasped every opportunity to work on school concerts and plays and attended art classes taught by master artist M.P. Alladin at the British Council. When art was eventually introduced at St. Mary’s, while he was still a student at the College, he was asked by the Principal to teach art courses for his peers. After leaving CIC, Mr. Berkeley studied at art schools in England for one year but withdrew because, as he put it, the programmes were too limiting and did not allow him to develop his art, his own style, his own techniques. Soon thereafter, he returned to Trinidad and there began a long and successful participation in the national festival, Carnival. At that time, the major Carnival bands depicted mainly historical mas, with accurate recreations of past civilizations. He changed that emphasis, bringing carnival bands into the realm of fantasy mas, with great impact. His distinctive formula has won him an unrivalled eleven Band of the Year awards, including six consecutive titles from 1989 to 1994, beating the record previously held by the great George Bailey. Over the years, Mr. Berkeley has designed costumes and sets for musical and dramatic productions in Trinidad, the United Kingdom and the USA – including a Las Vegas cabaret review in 1991. He has won several awards and prizes over the years, starting with on from the Imperial Institute in London when, at age twelve, he was selected to represent the then Crown Colony of Trinidad and Tobago at an exhibition of artists from all over the Commonwealth. In 1964, he received the silver medal from the Royal Horticultural Society for the best floral arrangement with a carnival theme. The high standard of his work resulted in him being commissioned to decorate the airport and the altar for the visit of the late Pope John Paul II in 1985 and the royal dais and garden setting for the visit of Queen Elizabeth that same year. Mr. Berkeley has contributed significantly to the arts in Trinidad and Tobago, in the process, helping to put this country’s name on the world map. In 1974, he was awarded the Humming Bird Medal (Gold), for his outstanding contribution to carnival and culture in Trinidad and Tobago.

Mr. Fenrick De Four, C.M.

Mr. Fenrick De Four, C.M. might best be described as extremely unpretentious but very much a high achiever in so many spheres of his life. The myriad contributions to Trinidad and Tobago and to the wider Caribbean by this great but humble man are largely unsung, thus giving life to a poem written by the English poet Rudyard Kipling: “So let us praise these famous men, men of little showing, for their work continueth and their work continueth far beyond their knowing”. Such a man was this inductee, whose work on engineering codes and standards improved the lives of hundreds of thousands of people in Trinidad and Tobago and the Caribbean, although the majority of them had never heard of him. The present chairman of the Board of Engineers of T&T said of him: “His influence went beyond engineering because he was the lead author of almost every national engineering code and standard which are all about protecting public safety and the engineering profession – which touches all aspects of our lives”. For almost half a century there was almost nothing happening in the profession of engineering in Trinidad and Tobago that did not involve him. He was a founding member, President and Fellow of APETT, the Association of Professional Engineers of Trinidad and Tobago, the first Secretary- General of the Council of Caribbean Engineering Organizations, the first Chairman of the Board of Engineering of Trinidad and Tobago (a position he held for twelve years) and President of the Association of Consulting Engineers of Trinidad and Tobago. As in engineering, he was equally selfless in his service to his fellow man, giving of his engineering and management skills to his church and to the community. He was a longstanding member of Opus Dei and an active member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society. He helped Servol with the management of its school in St. Ann’s, was a member of the Rosary Church Restoration Committee, and advised villagers in Toco on development plans for the area. He served on a number of State Boards including Textel and Telco as Chairman, and as a member of the Public Utilities Commission. His entrepreneurial spirit saw him found his own fi rm of architects and engineers – A De B Consultants Limited. Indeed Mr. De Four is a role model. He was the recipient of APETT’s prestigious Career in Excellence award for his long and distinguished career in engineering and the Chaconia Medal, Silver in 2004.

Bishop Malcolm Galt, C.S.Sp.

Bishop Malcolm Galt, C.S.Sp. was ordained priest in July 1955, in Dublin, Ireland and thereafter was assigned to Nigeria for a period of twelve years. During that time he taught at Christ the King College for four years and then served as the Regional Secretary at the Catholic Secretariat in Nigeria for another four years. In his final four years Bishop Galt did social work through the Catholic Relief Services in Lagos, Nigeria. On his return to Trinidad, he served as parish priest in a number of parishes. In July 1995, he was elevated to the position of Bishop and he chose as his Episcopal motto the Virgin Mary’s “Your will be done”. As both his priests and people will attest, he truly exemplifies this motto by his lifestyle. As the chief pastor of his diocese, he, through his simple lifestyle, has dedicated himself to shepherding his flock in every way. He does not allow the demands and trappings of his office to deter him from ministering to the sick and the needy. He observes an open door policy, which renders him completely available in dealing with his people. Like the late Archbishop Pantin, he is a good example of the Holy Ghost Fathers’ advice to its members: “Paratus ad omnia” – “Ready for all things”. As priest, Holy Ghost Father and Bishop, he has proven to be a wonderful follower of the Good Shepherd.

Professor Emeritus Dr. Kenneth S. Julien, T.C.

For over thirty years, Professor Emeritus Dr. Kenneth Julien has been a key player in the development of energy-based industries in Trinidad and Tobago. Dr. Julien is equally known for his accomplishments at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine campus where he was one of the founders of the Faculty of Engineering and headed the Department of Electrical engineering for twelve years. Through that medium, he has had significant influence on the education of many of the top engineers now practising in Trinidad and Tobago. His academic career at St. Mary’s was a brilliant one. Two years after graduating from CIC, he was awarded a scholarship by UBOT, a British multi-national oil company, to study engineering at the University of Nottingham where he topped the class. A few years later, he pursued his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at the University of British Columbia, where he was the first person to earn a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from that university. When Dr. Julien became Dean of the Faculty of Engineering at UWI, he was then the youngest person in the Commonwealth to hold such a post. But it is in the energy sector that he is best known for the significant contribution that he has made to the economic development of this country. He was the chairman of the Energy Co-ordinating Task Force, spearheading the massive industrialization drive that saw the establishment of the Point Lisas Industrial Estate and the energy-based industries. He is widely regarded as the country’s energy guru and the ‘father’ of the energy sector. Under his leadership, Trinidad and Tobago moved from being an unknown, to world leadership status in the export of a number of primary energy products. As Chairman of the Task Force and later the National Energy Corporation, he led this country’s entry into the global energy arena, building the Industrial Estate and port at Point Lisas, spawning entities such as Trinidad Nitrogen, ISCOTT, T&TEC’s Point Lisas Power Plant (now Powergen), FERTRIN Urea and Trinidad and Tobago Methanol. After bowing out of the limelight for some years, he returned to prominence in the 1990’s with his most significant achievement perhaps being the initiation, and development of Atlantic LNG, which has opened up gas market options that have stimulated off-shore exploration and production activity, leading to a rapid boost in reserves. Dr. Julien is a remarkable man who continues to contribute to the growth and development of this country in many ways, but mainly so as the Chairman of the University of Trinidad and Tobago. He was awarded the Trinity Cross for his outstanding and distinguished service in the fields of education, energy and national development and was named a National Icon in Science and Technology in Trinidad and Tobago in 2005.

Dr. Hollis Liverpool, H.B.M.

As a calypsonian, researcher and educator, Hollis Liverpool, aka Chalkdust, has devoted most of his adult life to the preservation and development of the calypso art form. Since he entered the realm of calypsodom, Chalkdust has been renowned for his incisive and crafty calypsoes. The quality of his calypsoes is such that a number of English Language teachers use his compositions to illustrate to their students the use of metaphors, similes and other fi gures of speech. Chalkdust has recorded over three hundred calypsoes or academic papers as he calls them with very few, if any, failing to reach the high lyrical standards that he has set for himself. More than any other calypsonian, he has played a crucial role in researching and documenting the rich history of calypso. He is well equipped to carry out research, considering his academic qualifi cations, which include a Bachelor of Arts degree in History and Sociology from the University of the West Indies, an M.A. in History and a Ph.D. in History and Ethnomusicology from the University of Michigan. He has written a multiplicity of books and papers, including his masterpiece, Rituals of Power and Rebellion in 2001. Chalkdust has demonstrated that calypso compositions can be both intelligent and entertaining. In this regard, he reminds us of another great calypsonian and alumnus of St. Mary’s who was inducted into the St.Mary’s Hall of Fame in 1997. We refer here to the legendary Raymond Quevedo who sang under the sobriquet of Atilla the Hun and who, together with this inductee, could be said to be two of the best calypsonians ever in Trinidad and Tobago. Chalkdust won the Buy Local competition on five occasions and the calypso King of the World contest twice. His strength in the skilful use of words to comment on social and political issues has seen him being crowned as the calypso Monarch of Trinidad and Tobago on seven occasions, with two of his most memorable compositions being The Driver Can’t Drive and the runaway winner in 2005 Ah Can’t Rhyme. He was awarded the Humming Bird Medal (Silver) in 1976 for his contribution to calypso.

Mr. George Padmore (Malcolm Nurse)

Mr. George Padmore (original name Malcolm Nurse) may hardly be known by today’s man in the street, but his activism in the 1940s and 1950s has been credited with inspiring the countries of Africa to achieve their independence from Europe. Certainly, his name is less well-known than his contemporary, CLR James, his close friend, Dr. Eric Williams, or two African leaders to whom he was a mentor and theoretician, Jomo Kenyatta of Kenya and Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana. After graduating from St. Mary’s, George attended universities such as Fisk, Howard and Columbia in the USA, pursuing studies as varied as law, sociology and medicine, though not actually completing them, at least not formally. In 1927, he joined the Communist party in the USA and changed his name to protect his family back in Trinidad from any unwanted attention from the colonial government. He went to the Soviet Union in 1929 where he became an active member of Communist International and being highly regarded by the Communist authorities, he was briefly elected to the Moscow City Soviet. He was the editor of the organ of the International Trade Union Committee of Negro Workers for a number of years, during which period he produced his fi rst book, The Life and Struggles of Negro Toilers. When Hitler came to power in 1933, he was deported to England where he remained for the next few years and met and influenced some of those who would become the leaders of the newly independent African and Caribbean colonies, among whom were Kenyatta, Nkrumah, T Ras Makonnen and Eric Williams. He became one of the main drivers of the Pan-African movement, organizing conferences and producing material for many journals and periodicals in Africa, the Caribbean and Asia. He identified with Nehru and his Indian National Congress’ struggle for independence, establishing an Asian-African Unity Committee in London to build bridges of friendship and solidarity between Africans and Indians. He began as a Communist but in 1945, when the Soviets asked him to stop criticizing its new war ally of Great Britain, he distanced himself from Soviet Communism and persuaded other Pan-Africanists to do likewise. He recanted his links with the USSR and is credited with keeping African countries from Communism. An intellectual with extraordinarily effective organizing abilities, George always went beyond the formulation of ideas, taking responsibility for political action and was indeed one of the fathers of Pan-Africanism.

Mr. Christopher Thomas, C.M.

After a short stint as a teacher at St. Mary’s, Christopher Thomas joined the Foreign Service of Trinidad and Tobago. He worked in several capacities in the Foreign Service and was later promoted to Permanent Secretary and Head of the Foreign Service. He was subsequently transferred to Venezuela as this country’s Ambassador, with concurrent accreditation to Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Christopher was seconded to the Organization of American States as Assistant Secretary General for a period of two terms, before returning to Trinidad when he was appointed as an Independent Senator. Thereafter, he left for Geneva to be an Inspector of the United Nations and while there, he was Chairman of various sub-committees. At the Organization of American States he was Chairman of a major committee from Mr. Christopher Thomas, C.M. 1990 to 2000 and later assumed chairmanship of the Inter-American Economic Council. He has written widely on Latin America and the Caribbean and is the author of two publications on the Organization of American States and several articles on the United Nations. He has been decorated on three occasions for his work: the Order of the Liberation by the Government of Venezuela (the highest honour conferred by that country on foreign dignitaries), the Chaconia Medal (Gold) and the Award of Excellency for Diplomacy from the Institute of Caribbean Studies. At present, Christopher Thomas is the Chairman of the Public Service Commission and the Police Service Commission in Trinidad and Tobago.

Sesquicentennial Memorabilia

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